Teri’s Sourdough Quick Bread

Contributed by: Teri LaFerney

Preheat oven to 350 degrees:

  • 3 Cups Self-Rising Flour
  • Almost 1/2 Cup Sugar
  • 16 oz. Sour Cream (Not light or fat free)
  • 2 1/2 Tbsp. Vegetable Oil
  • 1 Pkg. Rapid Rise Yeast, dissolved in 1/2-cup hot waterStir all bread recipe ingredients together until moistened and well blended. Mixture will be sticky, and just a bit lumpy. It may be stirred by hand, or with an electric mixer. Spray 1 loaf pan with cooking spray and bake for 45-50 minutes. Let cool slightly before slicing.
  • Teri’s Broccoli Cornbread

    Contributed by: Teri LaFerney

  • 1 stick butter, melted
  • 1 box Jiffy corn muffin mix
  • 4 eggs
  • 1 (10 oz.) pkg. chopped broccoli, thawed
  • 1 chopped onion
  • 12 oz. carton cottage cheese
  • 1 can Mexican corn, drainedMix all ingredients well and bake at 350 degrees for 30 to 35 minutes, using 15″x11″ or 9″x13″ pan.  This recipe makes about 12 servings of corn bread.
  • Shirley’s Home Made Bread

    Contributed by: Shirley LaFerney

  • 5 Cups all purpose Flour
  • 2 Tablespoons Oil
  • 6 Tablespoons Sugar
  • 2 Cups Warm Milk
  • 2 Packages Active Dry yeast
  • 1 Pinch of saltMix all ingredients together and cover bowl with a towel. Let stand at room temperature 1 hr. Divide into 2 greased bread pans. Let rise at room temperature about 1 hour uncovered until double in size. Bake in preheated 325-degree oven for 30 minutes or until golden brown.

    This recipe makes 2 loaves. 

  • Granny Wilmoth’s Easy Scratch Biscuits

    Contributed by: David LaFerney

    Source: Granny Wilmoth (Sally Almer Wilmoth (Stockton) – Shirley LaFerney’s (Maxwell) Maternal Grandmother

    I think Granny Wilmoth made a batch of these biscuits every single day, and they were eaten hot at breakfast and then stayed on the table to be eaten cold all day long, with any leftovers fed to the chickens. It’s a shame that such a simple thing has almost become a lost art.

    Method #1 for all of us amateurs:

  • 2 Cups of self-rising flour
  • 4 Tablespoons of shortening
  • 1 cup of milkPreheat the oven to 450 degrees. Put the flour in a mixing bowl and add the shortening. Mix until it looks like crumbs. Make a depression in the middle and add the Milk, and mix just until the loose dough comes together, but no longer, than you have to. Over mixing will make your biscuits tough.

    Method #2 for Grandmas and other experts

    Mixing bowl 1/2 full of flour

    4 Tablespoons of shortening (experts don’t need to measure they just know)

    1 cup of milk (again measuring is for sissies)

    Preheat the oven to 450 degrees. Make a depression in the middle of the flour. Put the shortening and milk into the depression. Use your fingers to gently mix the liquid around in the depression, you don’t want to mix it with all of the flour in the bowl just work the liquid around there in the middle until a loose dough forms. When it is solid, enough for you to pick it up you are done.  There isn’t really a set recipe, you just have to know what it is supposed to look like.

    Turn out dough onto a floured surface and sprinkle flour on top of the dough with your hands so that you can work with it without it sticking to everything. Use your floured hands to pat the dough out into a thin layer about 1/2 thick. Using a Campbell’s soup can with both ends cut out, cut your biscuits out by pressing straight down through the dough and then twisting after the cutter bottoms out. Place the biscuits on a greased baking sheet or iron pan with the sides just touching.

    Bake in a 450-degree oven until golden brown.

    Tips:

  • 1) Always preheat the oven before putting any recipe in it.
  • 2) Word on the street is that buttermilk will make lighter biscuits, but I never tried it.
  • 3) If you place the biscuits on the sheet 1/2 inches apart, they will cook up wider and brown on the sides.
  • Grandma LaFerney’s Sour Dough Bread

    Contributed by: Donna LaFerney Wheatley

    Source: Esther Jean LaFerney (Crocket)

    For a number of years, Mama’s Women’s group at the church would make this bread recipe and sell it to folks for their dinner as they left church on Sunday. The recipe originally came from Aunt Priscilla LaFerney, who is the youngest of Dad’s sisters, and one of the best cooks on the planet, though not as good as Mama, of course.

    First, you have to have a “Starter”:

    Starter for Sourdough Bread

  • 3/4-cup sugar
  • 3 T dry potato flakes (or buds)
  • 1-cup bread flour
  • 1-cup very warm, but not hot, water
  • 1 pkg. (2 1/4 t) yeastNever use a metal spoon or store the starter in a metal bowl! Mix and let stand at room temperature 8 to 12 hours in a covered container. Refrigerate. Give it a stir with a wooden spoon, everyday (or when you think of it).

    Use the starter, or feed it every five days or so. Always leave at least a cup of starter to start the next batch.

    When it’s time to feed the starter, use the above ingredients, but leave out the yeast. To share your starter with a friend, give them at least one cup of the starter and the recipe for feeding it and making the bread. (It makes a fun wedding or housewarming gift to put a loaf of the bread into a new loaf dish, and include the recipe and a cup of the starter with it.)

    Okay, now you have your Starter, here’s how to make the bread.

    Making the Sourdough Bread

  • 1-cup starter
  • 1/2-cup sugar
  • 1 1/2 cups very warm water
  • 1/2-cup corn oil
  • 1 T. salt
  • 6 cups bread flour. Mama’s original recipe said you could use all-purpose flour, but I don’t recommend that. I have found over the years, that bread flour is important. They’re all the same, unless you can find “King Arthur” brand bread flour. It makes a noticeably superior loaf. For whole wheat bread, you can use 4 cups of white bread flour and 2 cups of whole-wheat flour.Mix all the above ingredients well. Mama uses her big KitchenAid Stand Mixer. When I have made it, I mix all the ingredients, except the flour, together first, and then add the flour a cup or so at a time with a wood spoon until it gets too stiff. Then I turn out the dough and knead it, adding flour a cup or so at a time, until all the flour is mixed in. The dough will be smooth and elastic and not be sticking to your fingers (to the point of adhering to your skin) when there’s enough flour in it. Place the dough into a greased glass bowl, cover with a clean towel, and let it set at room temperature all day or all night (8 to 12 hours).

    Then, punch it down and knead it again for 2 minutes. Divide the dough into 2 or 3 pieces, roll each piece out into a kind of rectangle, roll the rectangle up, starting at the narrowest end, and tuck the ends of the rolled dough under to make it into a loaf, with the ends of the roll in the bottom of the pan. Place each loaf into a greased glass or corning ware loaf pan and brush the top with butter. Cover the loaves with tea towels again and let stand another 8 to 12 hours (all day or night).

    THEN bake them at 325 degrees for 25 minutes if you made 3 loaves, 30 minutes if you made two. If the tops start to get too brown, lay a piece of foil over the top in the oven.

    This sounds like a bunch of work, and it is, but it is the most heavenly divine bread you will ever put in your mouth!

  • Sour Dough Bread Starter

  • three quarters-cup sugar
  • 3 T dry potato flakes (or buds)
  • 1-cup bread flour
  • 1-cup very warm, but not hot, water
  • 1 pkg. (2 1/4 t) yeast
  • Note: This is not real sourdough bread starter, but it could turn into the real thing if you’re lucky. “Real” Sourdough bread starter contains lactobacilli bacteria which produces lactic acid and gives the bread its distinctive sour flavor. The bacteria is floating around in the air pretty much everywhere, and will infect your starter sooner or later at which point you will have “real” sourdough bread starter. Once your starter is cultured with lactobacilli, the lactic acid that it produces will help to prevent any bad bacteria from establishing itself. In any event, if your sourdough bread starter develops a putrid smell at any point, don’t take any chances, throw it out. You can get a genuine sourdough bread starter for free (by sending a self addressed stamped envelope) from CarlsFriends.org

    Back to the Recipe for Sourdough Starter

    Never use a metal spoon or store the starter in a metal bowl! Mix and let stand at room temperature 8 to 12 hours in a covered container. Refrigerate. Give it a stir with a wooden spoon, everyday (or when you think of it).

    Use the starter, or feed it every five days or so. Always leave at least a cup of starter to start the next batch.

    When it’s time to feed the starter, use the above ingredients, but leave out the yeast. To share your starter with a friend, give them at least one cup of the starter and the recipe for feeding it and making the bread. (It makes a fun wedding or housewarming gift to put a loaf of the bread into a new loaf dish, and include the recipe and a cup of the starter with it.)

    Note: “Real” Sourdough bread starter contains lactobacilli bacteria which produces lactic acid and gives the bread its distinctive sour flavor. The bacteria is floating around in the air pretty much everywhere, and will infect your starter sooner or later at which point you will have “real” sourdough bread starter. Once your starter is cultured with lactobacilli, the lactic acid that it produces will help to prevent any bad bacteria from establishing itself. In any event, if your sourdough bread starter develops a putrid smell at any point, don’t take any chances, throw it out.

    Aunt Donna’s Cornbread

    Contributed by: Donna Wheatley

    Source: Recipe found on the Back of the Martha White Cornbread Mix package

    I have Grandma Crockett’s iron skillet, and I use it exclusively for my cornbread. It will never be as good if you don’t use a black iron skillet.

    Preheat your oven to 425 degrees, put 2 Tablespoons of margarine in the bottom of your iron skillet and put it in the oven as the oven preheats.

    Stir together in a medium to large mixing bowl:

    1 1/2-cup Martha White Yellow Cornmeal mix

    1-cup All Purpose flour

    1/4-cup sugar

    Beat 2 eggs with a whisk in a small mixing bowl.

    Add:

  • 1 cup of milk
  • 1/4-cup oilWhisk again, and pour into the bowl with the dry ingredients. Stir together just until the dry ingredients are moistened.Now pour the batter into the hot margarine in the skillet and bake 450 degrees for 20 to 25 minutes.

    This is great cornbread. One of our family’s favorite ways to eat it is with Summer Vegetable Suppers. In other words, the menu consists of cornbread, fresh green beans, fresh corn, stewed squash, and tomato/cucumber/onion salad. Don’t forget butter and honey for the bread. (The second piece is dessert.)